For those who felt extra tired at work today, there is little doubt as to at least one of the main reasons for the additional dose of fatigue, namely, Daylight Saving Time. Although most welcome the increased sunshine and warm weather signaled by the clock adjustment, the transition is rarely a seamless one.

Not to worry of course, the internet is full of sleep gurus who are ready and willing to offer both obvious and innovative advice as to how to combat the sleep loss. Sometimes all that’s needed is a simple reminder of what is already evident.

Two such experts are Drs. Deepa Burman and Hiren Muzumdar, Co-directors of the Pediatric Sleep Evaluation Center at the University of Pittsburgh. Last week, The Conversation published an article written by the duo, in which they share eleven ways to ameliorate sleep difficulties resulting from the time change. Below are six of the ones most relevant to Generation Active:

Do not start with a “sleep debt.” Ensure that you and your child get adequate sleep on a regular basis in the weeks leading up to the time change each year. Most adults need anywhere from seven to nine hours of sleep daily to perform adequately. …

Use light to your advantage. Light is the strongest cue that helps adjusts our internal body clock. When possible, expose yourself to bright light early in the morning upon awakening. If you live somewhere where natural light may be limited in the morning after clocks change, use artificial bright lights to signal to your body clock to wake up earlier. As the season progresses, this will be less of an issue as the sun rises earlier in the day. Conversely, at night, minimize exposure to bright light, especially the blue light emitting from screens of electronic media. Turn off electronics even earlier than the usual recommended duration of one to two hours before bedtime. In some places, it might be helpful to have room- darkening curtains in the bedroom depending on how much sunlight that room gets at bedtime. …

Carefully plan your day and evening activities. Start planning your day the night before the time change with a good night’s sleep. …

Incorporate exercise in the morning and leave relaxing activities for the evening. This may help you to wind down. Take a walk even if it is just around the house or your office. …

Start with a protein-heavy breakfast, as sleep deprivation can increase appetite and craving for high-carbohydrate foods and sugars. …

Use electronics judiciously. Television, smartphones, tablets, and video games are some of the perils of the world we live in. While there are benefits of this technology, especially in helping people stay connected, it can be disruptive at bedtime and in the bedroom. The blue light emitted from these devices signals our internal clock to wake up later the next day and shifts our body rhythm. It is a modern-day challenge that we have to constantly deal with preserving our natural sleep wake rhythm and our health.

In addition to the items included above, the article also advises no caffeine after lunchtime and establishing a consistent rhythm and bedtime routine at the same time each evening. This is critical, regardless of the time change, and should be used both in anticipation and response of the biannual time changes.

To read Burman and Muzumdar’s full writeup, click here.